Karma Is Inconceivable

Posted by on Jun 20, 2007 in General, Philosophy | No Comments

I teach a lunchtime Chi Kung & Tai Chi class at SAIT. At the beginning of one of my classes we were chatting as usual and one of my students asked, “When did you move to Calgary?” “Almost seven years ago” I answered to her. Then she told to me how seven years ago one of her friends had been learning Tai Chi in Taiwan until her teacher moved to Calgary. She wanted to know, “Is that you?” I asked what’s her friend’s name was? She told me and I said, “Well, I think you are right.” I was amazed by how karma is inconceivable. Seven years ago my new not-yet-student heard my name from her friend but she wasn’t living in Calgary. Seven years passed during which she moved to Calgary and decided to take a Tai Chi classes at SAIT thereby meeting me.

Here is a story from Sakyamuni Buddha also about Karma:
One day a man of advanced age heard about Buddha spreading the dharma. He decided he wanted to become a monk so he went to Buddha’s place wanting to see him. But some of Buddha’s disciples stopped him at the doorway barring him from entering. All of these disciples were enlightened so they all had some kind of higher power. They squabbled at the doorway so loudly that Buddha, who was doing meditation, heard them. He came outside to see what was happening. One disciple said, “This man’s past 500 lives had no karma with you (no relationship with Buddha)”. So that why they stopped him.
Buddha got angry and said, “Araham (“The Worthy One”, an honorific for an enlightened being), you’re powers only let you see back 500 lifetimes, how do you know what happened before that? Five hundred lifetimes ago this old man was a dog. One day this dog was looking for food and found some excrement. Before he could eat it some people came and scared him so that his tail dragged in the excrement before he ran away. He ran to a tomb upon which he decided to urinate. His tail brushed the tomb and left some excrement on it. This tomb was The Great Araham’s (Buddha’s) tomb. (In doing so the dog had symbolically offered food to Buddha). This is how he has karma with me. He can be my student.”
This old man went on to become enlightened.

So when we read this story doesn’t it make you think karma is inconceivable?

–Danny

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